oil pump Seminar: Climate Economics

Lecture number: 800991
Block Seminar: January 10th-11th, 2020, Room 1.165 (Oec)
Kickoff Meeting: 23.10.2019, 1pm, Room 01.68 (Oec)
Application: until 30.10.2019
Enrollment in Flexnow: from 01.11. unti 14.11.2019.
Essay Submission: until 10.12.2019.
Seminar Info: info
Supervision: Matthias Beulmann: email
Introductory Reading for all participants: Nordhaus, W. (2019). Climate Change: The Ultimate Challenge for Economics. American Economic Review, 109(6), 1991-2014. article .
Course material for participants is available at the course material webpage

Themes

1. The Economic Impacts of Climate Change

Reference: Deschenes, O., and Greenstone, M. (2007). The economic impacts of climate change: evidence from agricultural output and random fluctuations in weather. American Economic Review, 97(1), 354-385.

2. The Social Cost of Carbon Revisited

Reference: Pindyck, R. S. (2019). The social cost of carbon revisited. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 94, 140-160.

3. Projections and Uncertainties about Climate Change

Reference: Nordhaus, W. (2018). Projections and uncertainties about climate change in an era of minimal climate policies. American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, 10(3), 333-60.

4. The Distribution of Environmental Damages

Reference: Hsiang, S., Oliva, P., and Walker, R. (2019). The distribution of environmental damages. Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, 13(1), 83-103.

5. Transition to Clean Technology

Reference: Acemoglu, D., Akcigit, U., Hanley, D., and Kerr, W. (2016). Transition to clean technology. Journal of Political Economy, 124(1), 52-104.

6.Directing Technical Change From Fossil-Fuel to Renewable Energy Innovation

Reference: Noailly, J., and Smeets, R. (2015). Directing technical change from fossil-fuel to renewable energy innovation: An application using firm-level patent data. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 72, 15-37.

7. Carbon Taxes, Path Dependency, and Directed Technical Change: Evidence from the Auto Industry

Reference: Aghion, P., Dechezlepretre, A., Hemous, D., Martin, R., and Van Reenen, J. (2016). Carbon Taxes, Path Dependency, and Directed Technical Change: Evidence from the Auto Industry. Journal of Political Economy, 124(1), 1-51.

8. Substitution Between Clean and Dirty Energy Inputs

Reference: Papageorgiou, C., Saam, M., and Schulte, P. (2017). Substitution between clean and dirty energy inputs: A macroeconomic perspective. Review of Economics and Statistics, 99(2), 281-290.

9. Adapting to Climate Change

Reference: Barreca, A., Clay, K., Deschenes, O., Greenstone, M., and Shapiro, J. S. (2016). Adapting to climate change: The remarkable decline in the US temperature-mortality relationship over the twentieth century. Journal of Political Economy, 124(1), 105-159.

10. Evolving comparative advantage and the impact of climate change

Reference: Costinot, A, D Donaldson and CB Smith (2016), Evolving comparative advantage and the impact of climate change in agricultural markets: Evidence from 1.7 million fields around the world. Journal of Political Economy 124(1): 205248.

11. Temperature, Physiology and the Wealth of Nations

Reference: Heal, G., and Park, J. (2013). Feeling the heat: Temperature, physiology & the wealth of nations (No. w19725). National Bureau of Economic Research

12. Temperature and the Allocation of Time

Reference: Graff Zivin, J., & Neidell, M. (2014). Temperature and the allocation of time: Implications for climate change. Journal of Labor Economics, 32(1), 1-26.

13. Climate Migrants and Local Conflicts

Reference: Bosetti, V., Cattaneo, C., and Peri, G. (2018). Should they stay or should they go? Climate Migrants and Local Conflicts (No. w24447). National Bureau of Economic Research.

14. Conflict, Climate, and Cells

Reference: Harari, M., and Ferrara, E. L. (2018). Conflict, climate, and cells: a disaggregated analysis. Review of Economics and Statistics, 100(4), 594-608.